Print

Chromotypography

(Fr.: chromotypographie; chromotypie; chromoxylographie; impression typographique en couleur; phototypochromie; typochromie)

Synonym for letterpress color printing, chromotype, chromoxylography and photochromotypography. Used as of 1881 with the Gillot paper (papier Procédé –see scratchboard).

G. Silbermann (1801–1876), in Strasbourg, was one of the most famous practitioners of letterpress color printing. His contribution to the graphic arts earned him a silver medal at the Exposition de l’industrie française of 1844. The jury was particularly impressed by his 1840 work, Album typographique, publié à l’occasion de la quatrième fête séculaire de l’invention de l’imprimerie. This book, which consisted of 38 (or 40 according to other sources) leaves, included color illustrations and a specimen of tissierography.

Chromotypography was adapted to the manufacture of wallpaper in France ca. 1740, and around the same period, Appert set up a factory for this kind of work in Paris, which was passed on to Réveillon (1760) who improved the process to the extant that he is considered the creator of wallpaper printing.

Chromotypography was also the name given to color half-tones produced by Hare & Company, ca. 1890. Samples of the process appeared in the trade publication British Printer of 1891 and 1892. Such reproductions were akin to chromolithographs, except that relief blocks, i.e., photoengraving, was employed. (Nadeau, Encyclopedia, p. xxx).

The first color print published by the Illustrated London News, in 1855 The first color print published by the Illustrated London News, in 1855

The first color print published by the Illustrated London News, in 1855. 400 x 265 mm.