Print

Photochromy

(Fr.: photochrome; photochromie; polychromie photographique)

1. PM. English name given to Léon Vidal’s color prints (photochrome) seen in the photographic exhibition in the Palais de l’Industrie in Paris in 1874. The prints were much like chromolithographs, except that the base illustration (key plate) was a photograph usually printed by the woodburytype process. In other cases, the colors were applied in sections (selected manually) made by the carbon transfer process.

2. PH. The term may also be used in the context of a dichromated colloid process, as dichromate is a “chromic compound,” e.g., “the photo-chromy of A. Poitevin.” The 30 or so licencees of poitevin’s process with ferric chloride and tartaric acid had to put a stamp on each print with the mention “Photochromie inaltérable. A.P. Breveté S.G.D.G.” (Nadeau, Encyclopedia, p. xxx.).
Photochromy by Léon Vidal, Paris, ca. 1890. 168x121 mm Photochromy by Léon Vidal, Paris, ca. 1890. 168 x 121 mm

Photochromy by Léon Vidal, Paris, ca. 1890. 168 x 121 mm.