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Photoxylograph

(Fr.: photographie sur bois; xylophotographie)

Name given to early photoengraving processes (from the mid-1850s on) that used the production of a photographic image on boxwood blocks as a guide for the engraver’s knife, instead of using an image drawn by hand on the wood block. The first modification to the woodcut or wood engraving process that we have found in the patent literature is in W.E. Newton’s Engl. Pat. 1511, of May 27, 1857. The first commercial application is attributed to T. Bolton, in 1861 but photoxylography was used extensively by the Illustrated London News from Dec. 29, 1860. Pannemaker and his students are mentioned as the best practitioners of this art. (Nadeau, Encyclopedia, p. xxx.).

Photoxylograph, 1856 Photoxylograph, 1856

Photoxylograph, 1856.

One of the earliest engraved blocks, first published in the Art Journal, 1854. 65 x 65 mm. One of the earliest engraved blocks, first published in the Art Journal, 1854. 65 x 65 mm.

One of the earliest engraved blocks, first published in the Art Journal, 1854. 65 x 65 mm.