Print

Carbro, Three-Color

(Fr.: ozobromie trichrome; carbro trichrome)

A SUBTRACTIVE and ASSEMBLY printing process that is the three-color version of the original CARBRO process. Tricolor carbro prints are made of colored gelatin reliefs derived from CARBON tissues, in which differential insolubilization is produced by chemical reaction between the silver of the BROMIDE prints and the pigmented tissue (instead of a chemical reaction between light and DICHROMATED pigment tissue.)

Tricolor carbro quickly became the most popular printing process for professionals in the 1920s replacing three-color CARBON and RAYDEX. At the Royal Photographic Society’s Exhibition of Color Photography in 1931, 90% of the color prints were made by the AUTOTYPE CARBRO PROCESS. Interestingly, most photomechanical printing in England during that period made use of HAND-COLORED PRINTS while in America carbros were the rule. This later changed with the introduction of the VIVEX process. Autotype was the major supplier of carbro materials, until 1937 when Devin (later MC GRAW COLORGRAPH) of Burbank, California, introduced superior products.

In America, despite its complexity and high cost, carbro was the process par excellence for the advertising industry until the 1950s when it was displaced by the easier and less expensive KODAK DYE TRANSFER process. Two of the better known exponents of tricolor carbro were Victor Keppler and Paul Outerbridge, who wrote at length on their techniques. (Nadeau, Encyclopedia, p. xxx.).

 

Three-color carbro portrait of Gina Lollobrigida, ca. 1950. 375 x 294 mm. Nadeau Encyclopedia, p. xxx. Three-color carbro portrait of Gina Lollobrigida, ca. 1950. 375 x 294 mm. Nadeau Encyclopedia, p. xxx.

Three-color carbro portrait of Gina Lollobrigida, ca. 1950. 375 x 294 mm.

Jane Fonda (b. 1937) three-color Carbro. Dated March 3,1960. 526x432 mm Jane Fonda (b. 1937) three-color Carbro. Dated March 3,1960. 526x432 mm

Jane Fonda (b. 1937) three-color Carbro. Dated March 3, 1960. 526 x 432 mm.