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Orotone

(Fr.: orotone; photodorure)

Used extensively by Edward Sheriff Curtis (1868-1952), this “process” involved the making of an ordinary NEGATIVE, which was then printed on another GLASS PLATE to produce a POSITIVE.

This positive was then backed in gold and often put into an ornate and gilded frame. The process was used by Curtis around 1910, at the height of his popularity, to record the life of North American Indians. He referred to his PRINTS as CURTONES, although they were better known as “gold tones.” (Nadeau, Encyclopedia, p. xxx)

Orotone of Lincoln portrait. Frame 250 x 195 mm Orotone of Lincoln portrait. Frame 250 x 195 mm

Orotone of Lincoln portrait. Frame 250 x 195 mm