Print

Carbro, Monochrome

(Fr.: carbro; ozobromie)

(1919-1950s) A process combining both CARBON TRANSFER and BROMIDE processes, hence the name coined by H.F. Farmer, in 1919. Autotype of London introduced the process commercially in 1919. In the carbro process pigmented gelatin is insolubilized through a chemical reaction between a silver image (from a SILVER BROMIDE print) and a pigmented gelatinized paper, often called "pigment tisue". Parts of the pigmented gelatin that is not insolubilized simply dissolve in hot water, leaving a pigmented positive image on paper. The process was adopted to color photography in the 1920s when it became the leading professional color process until the 1960s. Carbro prints are usually permanent.

Complete technical details on carbro printing can be found in our History and Practice of Carbon Processes, (1982). The CARBON version of this process, which we prefer, is fully described in our book Modern Carbon Printing. (Nadeau, Encyclopedia, p. xxx).

Our illustration is a fine example of landscape photography from the 1940-50's. It is signed by the artist Waverly. Image size: 25.4 cm x 19 cm. Our illustration is a fine example of landscape photography from the 1940-50's. It is signed by the artist Waverly. Image size: 25.4 cm x 19 cm.

Our illustration is a fine example of landscape photography from the 1940-50's. It is signed by the artist Waverly. Image size: 254 x 190 mm.

Carbro on bromide by Luis Nadeau, 1974. 202 x 312 mm Carbro on bromide by Luis Nadeau, 1974. 202 x 312 mm

Carbro on bromide by Luis Nadeau, 1974. 202 x 312 mm